Friday, June 20, 2008

World of Warcraft Trick: How to Speed up your Bandwidth by 20%





Here's a little guide on how to free up a lot of bandwidth and increase your internet speeds:

Windows uses 20% of your bandwidth Here's how to Get it back

A nice little tweak for XP. Microsoft reserve 20% of your available bandwidth for their own purposes (suspect for updates and interrogating your machine etc..)

Here's how to get it back:

Click Start-->Run-->type "gpedit.msc" without the "

This opens the group policy editor. Then go to:


Local Computer Policy-->Computer Configuration-->Administrative Templates-->Network-->QOS Packet Scheduler-->Limit Reservable Bandwidth


Double click on Limit Reservable bandwidth. It will say it is not configured, but the truth is under the 'Explain' tab :

"By default, the Packet Scheduler limits the system to 20 percent of the bandwidth of a connection, but you can use this setting to override the default."

So the trick is to ENABLE reservable bandwidth, then set it to ZERO.

This will allow the system to reserve nothing, rather than the default 20%.

ALSO:
Start--> run-->type in "regedit" without ".
Go to the folder HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\VxD\MSTCP
Find the string called DefaultRcvWindow . Edit the number to 64240 (Original value is 373360)

I have tested on XP Pro, and 2000
other o/s not tested.



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4 kommentarer:

Tony Taylor on October 20, 2009 at 12:00 PM said...

I just tried it, but it says "Windows cannot find gpedit.msc. Make sure you typed the name correctly and then try again". I have windows XP home edition running. Whatcha think?

Anonymous said...

I think that bandwidth is only used when your actually downloading updates....Are you sure Windows takes that 20% all the time?

Anonymous said...

it works great amagod

Kucherkokoff said...

Yeah, Ive noticed you can also override this/ improve upon this by having streaming video going on in the background.

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